increases your character’s power

‘Grinding’ is an entirely subjective measure of whether the game is enjoyable or not.And yet, I have also played Icewind Dale and enjoyed it, despite the fact that it is simply an

Infinity Engine game focused entirely on combat. The crucial difference: my focus being on combat in Icewind Dale made combat work for me; my focus being on character

development in Planescape: Torment made combat not work for me. I also freely and happily grant that my problems with Infinity Engine combat are mine, personal, and not

necessarily those of the majority of the games’ players. In other words, being annoyed at combat becomes a subjective and personal association with the game.

If I dislike combat in Baldur’s Gate, it will feel like a grind, even if I happen to enjoy exactly the same combat in Icewind Dale. The exploration that makes Skyrim such a delight at its

very best can also make it feel mechanical and dull at its worst.A recent article from game designer Ara Shirinian on Gamasutra discusses this issue from a more technical, developer-oriented standpoint: ”…it is largely a matter of just going through the required motions to reach completion. There isn’t much of a performance component. The same is with grinding

in video games, which players voluntarily suffer for the reward of accumulating some virtual statistic that in turn increases your character’s power or agency in the game.”While I agree with the general thrust of his article – that repetition isn’t necessarily a bad thing in games – I think that his reference to RPGs as being the negative form of this is misguided.

What he describes here is grinding at its worst, but, at least in terms of single-player games, it’s extraordinarily rare in modern games. It doesn’t exist in Dragon Age: Origins or the Mass Effect series, unless you could the latter’s multiplayer, which I don’t

consider a grind at all. I don’t see it in Fallout: New Vegas. Skyrim doesn’t have it. Diablo 3 may have it, but that game’s combat system is enjoyable on its own that, unless you get

deep into its ”endgame,” grinding simply isn’t an appropriate term. (I am deliberately focusing on single-player games here; massively multiplayer RPGs are more complicated and I’ll almost certainly be discussing that in the future).

 

VN:F [1.9.22_1171]
Rating: 0.0/10 (0 votes cast)
VN:F [1.9.22_1171]
Rating: 0 (from 0 votes)

Comments are closed.