the real money auction house

Who cares, right? What does it matter if we allow ourselves to escape into a world where we kill without consequence or steal bottle caps from an old blind woman? In truth, it doesn’t–or rather it didn’t, until recently. You see, a little game called Diablo 3 launched a few months ago, and on June 12, 2012, Blizzard opened up an auction house that utilizes real world currency to 

purchase digital items found in the game. All of a sudden that sense of moral impunity inherent to gaming could be economically dangerous, especially considering how far removed selling items

 in a digital auction house is from stealing from a tip jar.The gaming world has already reacted negatively to the introduction of the real money auction house (RMAH). Countless articles since the 

game’s release bemoan the creation of a system that sanctions monetary purchases in lieu of skill or dedication to the game and its system of rules. 

In Diablo 2, many players would often band together for the sake of completing “dungeon crawls” or “Mephisto runs” to get rare equipment that could not be found elsewhere. Now all we need 

to do is click on the auction house link and buy whatever we need. Moreover, Diablo 2 is an inherently more social game than Diablo 3–and the auction house is further proof of this. In Diablo 2, skills and classes often included a social element that would benefit an online party. The Paladin, for example, had an entire skill tree

 devoted to “auras” that would bolster the stats of other members of your party. This fostered a sense of comradery and community as players would  pick their party based on skills that

 complement each other.This is heavily contrasted in Diablo 3, where the individual is the focal point, as evidenced by the skill-boosting items available for purchase in the RMAH.  

With Diablo 3, the bonding experience shared by players has all but disappeared because of the introduction of free market capitalism. Instead of working with others to beat a boss on the

 hardest difficulty, any individual with a fat wallet can simply hack their way through the higher difficulty levels and upgrade their equipment as opposed to their tactics or parties. By doing so, 

we’re being forced to participate and cheat by way of transactional expediency and not actual work or skill.  Blizzard has changed the rules of the game and discounted social interaction for the

 sake of individual accomplishment. And like the person who takes a pencil and notepad from work, nobody thinks there is anything wrong with buying a better item in lieu of earning it through 

teamwork. 

VN:F [1.9.22_1171]
Rating: 0.0/10 (0 votes cast)
VN:F [1.9.22_1171]
Rating: 0 (from 0 votes)

Comments are closed.